Archaeologists have found ancient Egyptian “school notebooks”. Fragments of children’s “homework” have been preserved on them.

(ORDO NEWS) — German archaeologists in the ancient Egyptian city of Afribis discovered more than 18,000 ceramic tiles that served as school notebooks. They preserved records that ancient Egyptian schoolchildren made during their classes.

In Egypt, found preserved “student notebooks”, which were written by ancient Egyptian schoolchildren

Afribis is an ancient Egyptian city that was thought to be lost for some time. It was located along the Nile River and was the capital of ancient Egypt.

Now, Egyptologists from the University of Tübingen (Germany) have discovered about 18 thousand small ceramic tiles – ostraca on the site of the city.

In fact, these are fragments of clay jars that were used in ancient Egypt as notebooks – they wrote shopping lists, recorded transactions, or used them as student notebooks. They were much more accessible than papyrus.

Archaeologists have found ancient Egyptian school notebooks Fragments of childrens homework have been preserved on them 2

German archaeologists believe that their finds were just used by children while studying at school.

“[The cards] have lists of months, numbers, arithmetic problems, grammar exercises and a ‘bird alphabet’ – each letter was represented by a bird whose name began with that letter,” said Egyptologist Christian Leitz from the University of Tübingen.

Archaeologists have found ancient Egyptian school notebooks Fragments of childrens homework have been preserved on them 3

At the same time, more than a hundred of the found ostracons were covered with repeated words – it seems that it was on these tiles that schoolchildren honed their writing skills.

Archaeologists have found ancient Egyptian school notebooks Fragments of childrens homework have been preserved on them 4

Most of the notes discovered are written in Demotic, which was the state script used during the reign of Ptolemy XII (better known today as the father of Cleopatra), who reigned from 81 to 59 BC. e. and later from 55 to 51 BC. e.

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