A catastrophic drought in Italy has opened a long sunken ship to people

(ORDO NEWS) — This year, Italy is facing the worst drought in seventy years. Rivers and lakes are rapidly becoming shallow, including the country’s largest river Po.

The Po originates in the Cotes Alps. Having overcome more than 650 kilometers, it flows into the Adriatic Sea. The lack of water led to the appearance of the remains of old ships that sank in this river.

Shipwreck

According to the source, the drought showed the world a shipwreck during the Second World War. Zibello, a 48-meter-long barge that was transporting timber at the time and sank in 1943, usually hides underwater. Now the water level in the river is so low that the wreckage can be seen by the audience.

The wreckage was photographed and published by amateur photographer Alessio Bonin using a drone.

A catastrophic drought in Italy has opened a long sunken ship to people 1
The barge appeared from under the water
A catastrophic drought in Italy has opened a long sunken ship to people 2
The barge appeared from under the water

In recent years, you could see the bow of the boat, so we knew it was there, but to see the boat so open in March, when it was actually still winter, was very dramatic. I have never seen such a drought this time of year our main concern was once floods in our river, and now we are worried that it will disappear, ” Bonin said.

A catastrophic drought in Italy has opened a long sunken ship to people 3
Zibello’s barge from a different angle
A catastrophic drought in Italy has opened a long sunken ship to people 4
Zibello’s barge from a different angle

The main reason for this situation is called global climate change .

  • As the Associated Press reports , northern Italy has seen no rain for almost four months, and snowfall intensity has dropped by 70 percent.
  • As a result, the surrounding rivers do not receive the required inflow of water.
  • In addition, due to the increased air temperature, the rate of melting of alpine glaciers has also increased.
  • The supply of drinking water, the irrigation of agricultural fields and the operation of hydroelectric power stations are now under threat.
  • In one coastal village called Boretto, the river flow is typically 476,000 gallons per second, according to the local government. Now it’s only 80 thousand gallons per second.

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