Feathers

  • News HeadlinesMarriage feathers of woodcocks were the brightest in nature

    Marriage feathers of woodcocks were the brightest in nature

    (ORDO NEWS) — Small and inconspicuous woodcock forest birds hide several white and incredibly bright feathers in their tails. They reflect up to 55 percent of the incident rays, so that males caring for females remain clearly visible even in the weakest light. Woodcocks ( Scolopax rusticola ) inhabit temperate forests throughout Eurasia. The variegated plumage makes them invisible in the tree crown, hiding these small birds from predators. In the…

  • News HeadlinesBird feathers can help fight icing 1

    Bird feathers can help fight icing

    (ORDO NEWS) — For a long time, people could not understand how penguins contrive not to be covered with ice, swimming in Antarctic waters and in contact with frosty air. Now scientists have figured it out, and the new discovery will help develop anti-icing materials to protect power lines and windmill blades. Under the weight of freezing ice, power lines break every year, leaving thousands of people without light and…

  • News Headlinesbright feathers of pterosaurs emperors indicated the complexity of their behavior 1

    Bright feathers of pterosaurs-emperors indicated the complexity of their behavior

    (ORDO NEWS) — The crest of a South American pterosaur that lived in the Cretaceous period was decorated with bright feathers, very similar to dinosaur feathers. Apparently, their ancient common ancestor still had such – and since that time, the animals of these groups have been distinguished by complex behavior. Tupandactyl emperor in flight. Modern large birds of similar wingspan have a smaller body length. How pterosaurs managed to fly…

  • News HeadlinesHollow Melanosomes From A 130 Million Year Old Fossil Suggest Earliest Appearance Of Brilliant Iridescent Colour In Bird Feathers

    Hollow Melanosomes From A 130 Million-Year-Old Fossil Suggest Earliest Appearance Of Brilliant Iridescent Colour In Bird Feathers

    (ORDO NEWS) — SEM and TEM observations of the feathers on an Early Cretaceous basal bird Eoconfuciusornis, from 130-million-year old lake deposits in Fengning, Hebei Province in northern China, present the earliest record of hollow melanosomes from feathers. They are preserved as rods with air holes and roughly circular in cross section. “I am very surprised by this observation, if proven true, it would be a really exciting discovery”, says…