In the Milky Way, astronomers have discovered an unknown cluster of stars

(ORDO NEWS) — A cluster of stars has formed in the Milky Way, very close in cosmic terms to the solar system. It is 75 million years old and it is called Valparaiso -1. Only at the time of the formation of Valparaiso-1 there were 10 thousand stars that weighed no less than our Sun.

Reported by Sciencealert.

An open cluster is a group of stars that emerged at one time from a single cloud of dust and gases. Therefore, all stars will have an identical composition, they move through their galaxy. This object is different from other clusters, so they could not find it for a long time. This was told by an astrophysicist from the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands, Ricardo Dorda.

Astronomers said that Valparasio – 1 is 7000 light years from Earth. The stars there are so bright that some can be seen with a regular telescope. Despite the great age and close location of the cluster, astronomers discovered it quite recently.

For searches, we used data obtained with the Gaia telescope. He is engaged in drawing up a map, which reflects not only the position of space objects, but also their movement. Scientists have found that all the stars from Valparasio – 1 move together in the same orbit around the center of the Galaxy.

Scientists are confident that this discovery is a real gift for science. Proof of the existence of such objects proves the fact that space has not been explored at all. Thanks to the discovery, scientists will be able to explore more of the intermediate stage in the evolution of stars in the open cluster. Astronomers are also now interested in studying the environment at Valparasio – 1.

Astrophysicists also said that throughout the study of the Universe, they found a large number of young clusters (up to 25 million years old), as well as old ones. And only this find is proof of the existence of clusters of middle age.

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